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REVIEW: TALKIE – HABLAS

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TALKIE
HABLAS

Slospeak Records and
MilkCarton Media Group

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If you’re familiar with Talkie’s self-titled EP that came out earlier this year (the rambunctious, 5 song coming-of-age snapshot) their double album Hablas might seem like its from an entirely different band. And you’re right: the 16 songs that comprise the introspective record take on a tone that is of a uniquely distinct group: a matured and worn band of brothers and friends that have gotten their emotions bashed about but have kept it together to tell you their tales with a margarita in hand.

If you were to put the band’s previously mentioned EP immediately in front of Hablas, it’s almost uncanny how the two create a sonic progression, from one into the other, and how you can almost hear the change in the band’s palette from the slow chugging and high-pitched guitar of the EP’s last track “Pretty” to the beginning of the latest album—which starts with the sounds of fumbling and learning, like children playing with building blocks, as the band begins to piece together how their sound is going to evolve.

The sounds contained within the album are vast: there are times that the sound is more closely related to the music the band has lived in previously and invoke a garage-rock romantic sensibility (“Rollercoaster”), times when a straight up 70’s vibe is present (“Sunny,” etc), and even others that stick to a much more modern indie-rock outfit. The instrumentation and experimentation within in it works and ultimately pairs with the lyrical content rather well, expanding on the experience of the album itself and creating a cohesive whole.

The first track on Hablas, “Mountain,” serves as the perfect introduction and summary to the body of music that is contained after it. It’s a song about (seemingly) hiding away from the outside world and removing yourself from the crowds beyond the windows. Or more specifically, hiding yourself from a once known face within said crowd. It’s a specific retreat. “Mountain” begins with the  search for a sound but it ends in a flurry of instruments and recored applause. In the end, the track is also a celebration of putting this seclusion behind one’s self and reemerging into the strange world to relearn things. “I’m coming down the mountain / I’m coming to see the people.” As the narrator begins to remove themself from the void, they begin to recount what leads to the retreat in the first place, and it’s found within some of the most subtly poignant lyrics the band has on the album: “Has the river run dry / For you and I / We’re just waiting on a sign.” The mutual evaporation discussed in these lines is what makes up the instrumental and lyrical backbone of the album.

Throughout the album, relationships (past, present, and future) form the core of the musical discussion. “Mountain” initiates the theme with its narrator returning to tell their story, then it continues into “Sunny,” a song that discusses what it’s like to be with someone you’re not entirely head-over-heels with but the relationship seems comfortable and it works…for now. It’s a song that’s about moving through life’s seasons with a significant other, promising each one that you will treat them better than their last companion and that you “wouldn’t do that to you.” The narrator seems to speak of hallow actions that lead to hallow relationships. “Ricky” talks about what it’s like to try to find your specific place in life but continually not feeling accepted in the circles you find yourself in. The song discusses what it’s like to try to break out of your comfort zone because life is starting to feel stale and old. The narrator promotes following the path of your passion, but bewares of confusing a passion with an escape. “Kronenberg” is where the positivity of the album begins to take shape as the narrator is surprised by the genuine happiness within a relationship, but is apologetic in the face of this happiness because of the baggage he carries with him from ghosts of relationships past. The sincerity of these tracks told by the narrator is one that proves to be crushingly relative. It’s as if we are in the room as these tales are being told after each blow is dealt. But we are also there for each realization, for each “go get ’em tiger” moment.

Hablas is a collection of songs about heartbreak and renewal; of exhaustive attempts at love and numerous failures. It’s about learning from your mistakes but also getting really damned discouraged from time to time. It’s also about being ok with that and realizing that yes, shit does happen but it doesn’t have to be the end each time it does. There’s always a downward slope to the previous jagged hill. Hablas is also an album that demands multiple listens. It’s the beginning of something: there are times that you have to exert some energy to get to that moment that serenely works, but the journey taken, both with the band and with the narrator, is one of progress and ultimate excitement. This is a band that is experimenting, that enjoys every minute behind their instruments, and who feels as drained and renewed as the characters in the songs. Talkie is not a band to take lightly; their ability to manipulate their sonic environment and provide an impeccably sincere experience is captivating. Though Hablas is a 16 track double album, there’s just not enough music by these boys out in the world. Here’s to much more in the future.

Talkie is comprised of brothers Brad Hagmann (guitar and vocals) and brother Matt Hagmann (bass and vocals), Christopher Issacs on guitar, and Eric Martin banging it out on the drums. Each member has been in their own respective bands through the years but none of that really matter because they are Talkie now and this is the band people will be talking about.

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TALKIE
HABLAS

Slospeak Records and
MilkCarton Media Group

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If you’re familiar with Talkie’s self-titled EP that came out earlier this year (the rambunctious, 5 song coming-of-age snapshot) their double album Hablas might seem like its from an entirely different band. And you’re right: the 16 songs that comprise the introspective record take on a tone that is of a uniquely distinct group: a matured and worn band of brothers and friends that have gotten their emotions bashed about but have kept it together to tell you their tales with a margarita in hand.

If you were to put the band’s previously mentioned EP immediately in front of Hablas, it’s almost uncanny how the two create a sonic progression, from one into the other, and how you can almost hear the change in the band’s palette from the slow chugging and high-pitched guitar of the EP’s last track “Pretty” to the beginning of the latest album—which starts with the sounds of fumbling and learning, like children playing with building blocks, as the band begins to piece together how their sound is going to evolve.

The sounds contained within the album are vast: there are times that the sound is closer related to the music the band has lived in previously and invoke a garage-rock romantic sensibility (“Rollercoaster”), times when a straight up 70’s vibe is present (“Sunny,” etc), and even others that stick to a much more modern indie-rock outfit. The instrumentation and experimentation within in it works and ultimately pairs with the lyrical content rather well, expanding on the experience of the album itself and creating a cohesive whole.

The first track on Hablas, “Mountain,” serves as the perfect introduction and summary to the body of music that is contained after it. It’s a song about (seemingly) hiding away from the outside world and removing yourself from the crowds beyond the windows. Or more specifically, hiding yourself from a once known face within said crowd. It’s a specific retreat. “Mountain” begins with the  search for a sound but it ends in a flurry of instruments and recored applause. In the end, the track is also a celebration of putting this seclusion behind one’s self and reemerging into the strange world to relearn things. “I’m coming down the mountain / I’m coming to see the people.” As the narrator begins to remove themself from the void, they begin to recount what leads to the retreat in the first place, and it’s found within some of the most subtly poignant lyrics the band has on the album: “Has the river run dry / For you and I / We’re just waiting on a sign.” The mutual evaporation discussed in these lines is what makes up the instrumental and lyrical backbone of the album.

Throughout the album, relationships (past, present, and future) form the core of the musical discussion. “Mountain” initiates the theme with its narrator returning to tell their story, then it continues into “Sunny,” a song that discusses what it’s like to be with someone you’re not entirely head-over-heals with but the relationship seems comfortable and it works…for now. It’s a song that’s about moving through life’s seasons with a significant other, promising each one that you will treat them better than their last companion and that you “wouldn’t do that to you.” The narrator seems to speak of hallow actions that lead to hallow relationships. “Ricky” talks about what it’s like to try to find your specific place in life but continually not feeling accepted in the circles you find yourself in. The song discusses what it’s like to try to break out of your comfort zone because life is starting to feel stale and old. The narrator promotes following the path of your passion, but bewares of confusing a passion with an escape. “Kronenberg” is where the positivity of the album begins to take shape as the narrator is surprised by the genuine happiness within a relationship, but is apologetic in the face of this happiness because of the baggage he carries with him from ghosts of relationships past. The sincerity of these tracks told by the narrator is one that proves to be crushingly relative. It’s as if we are in the room as these tales are being told after each blow is dealt. But we are also there for each realization, for each “go get ’em tiger” moment.

Hablas is a collection of songs about heartbreak and renewal; of exhaustive attempts at love and numerous failures. It’s about learning from your mistakes but also getting really damned discouraged from time to time. It’s also about being ok with that and realizing that yes, shit does happen but it doesn’t have to be the end each time it does. There’s always a downward slope to the previous jagged hill. Hablas is also an album that demands multiple listens. It’s the beginning of something: there are times that you have to exert some energy to get to that moment that serenely works, but the journey taken, both with the band and with the narrator, is one of progress and ultimate excitement. This is a band that is experimenting, that enjoys every minute behind their instruments, and who feels as drained and renewed as the characters in the songs. Talkie is not a band to take lightly; their ability to manipulate their sonic environment and provide an impeccably sincere experience is captivating. Though Hablas is a 16 track double album, there’s just not enough music by these boys out in the world. Here’s to much more in the future.

Talkie is comprised of brothers Brad Hagmann (guitar and vocals) and brother Matt Hagmann (bass and vocals), Christopher Issacs on guitar, and Eric Martin banging it out on the drums. Each member has been in their own respective bands through the years but none of that really matter because they are Talkie now and this is the band people will be talking about.

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