Skip links

SONG PREMIERE: BRIAN BERGER–”CULT PREACHING GROUNDS”

[spb_column col_bg_type=”cover” col_parallax_image_movement=”fixed” col_parallax_image_speed=”0.5″ col_padding=”0″ col_animation=”none” col_animation_delay=”0″ col_responsive_vis=”hidden-xs_hidden-sm” width=”1/2″ el_position=”first”] [spb_text_block animation=”none” animation_delay=”0″ padding_vertical=”0″ padding_horizontal=”0″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]

SONG PREMIERE: BRIAN BERGER–”CULT PREACHING GROUNDS”


[/spb_text_block] [spb_blank_spacer height=”30px” width=”1/2″ el_position=”first”] [spb_text_block animation=”none” animation_delay=”0″ padding_vertical=”0″ padding_horizontal=”0″ width=”1/2″ el_position=”last”]

[sf_social_share]

[/spb_text_block] [/spb_column] [spb_column col_bg_type=”cover” col_parallax_image_movement=”fixed” col_parallax_image_speed=”0.5″ col_padding=”0″ col_animation=”none” col_animation_delay=”0″ col_responsive_vis=”hidden-xs_hidden-sm” width=”1/2″ el_position=”last”] [spb_blank_spacer height=”20px” width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”] [spb_text_block animation=”none” animation_delay=”0″ padding_vertical=”0″ padding_horizontal=”0″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]

Brian Berger is much like many musicians out there: he’s better at playing his music than being in a relationship. He’s a 20-something year-old guy who is still looking for something to work out and prove that not every dating experience has to end in Fourth of July explosions–and not the good kind, the kind that explode in your hand after you’re a little buzzed and you forget you lit it 20 seconds ago and cause you to go cursing into the night. The failings of his relationships are what form the basis of his latest song “Cult Preaching Grounds”

The track seems to take place at various times after a relationship–minutes after, what seems like days after, and even what appears to be the breakup that happens in the narrator’s head before the other party is notified, all blurring together in a bitter haze. The drunken narrator discussing the regrets that they are going to wake up to after they sleep off their booze-riddled hate-calls of the night before. The song is almost like a breakup timeline: the immediate and resentful drunk calls after the breakup occurs (“I am saying, ‘Fuck you, I wish that I had never met you'”), the moments when you offer a bit of parting advice and truly wish the other the best (“Just know I’ve felt sad enough for us both / So you be happy / And I’ll be me”), and looking in the rearview mirror with teary eyes remembering the best times and forgetting the bad (“And I am thinking / Of accents / Of Leonard Cohen of Scotland of green grass / Of being inches from your face and your electrical gaze”). It ends with a line that tends to haunt you like a ghost poet, a line that brings the rest of the song and the jumbled timeline together into an “oh shit” moment: “It’s more exciting to be fragile.” The honest realization that our lives are more interesting and hold more meaning when we open ourselves up and allow ourselves to be vulnerable to the outside world.

“Cult Preaching Grounds” is off Berger’s latest solo full-length Still Life with Prudence. Crack open a shitty beer and take a listen to the song below. Be sure to pick up, download, and stream the album when it becomes available next Tuesday, January 12 and check back here for a full review of the album as well.

[/spb_text_block] [/spb_column] [spb_row wrap_type=”content-width” row_bg_type=”color” color_row_height=”content-height” bg_type=”cover” parallax_image_height=”content-height” parallax_image_movement=”fixed” parallax_image_speed=”0.5″ bg_video_loop=”yes” parallax_video_height=”window-height” row_top_style=”none” row_bottom_style=”none” parallax_video_overlay=”none” row_overlay_opacity=”0″ row_padding_vertical=”0″ row_padding_horizontal=”0″ row_margin_vertical=”0″ remove_element_spacing=”no” vertical_center=”true” inner_column_height=”col-natural” row_expanding=”no” row_animation=”none” row_animation_delay=”0″ row_responsive_vis=”hidden-lg_hidden-md” width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”] [spb_text_block animation=”none” animation_delay=”0″ padding_vertical=”0″ padding_horizontal=”0″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]

SONG PREMIERE: BRIAN BERGER–”CULT PREACHING GROUNDS”


[/spb_text_block] [spb_text_block animation=”none” animation_delay=”0″ padding_vertical=”0″ padding_horizontal=”0″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]

Brian Berger is much like many musicians out there: he’s better at playing his music than being in a relationship. He’s a 20-something year-old guy who is still looking for something to work out and prove that not every dating experience has to end in Fourth of July explosions–and not the good kind, the kind that explode in your hand after you’re a little buzzed and you forget you lit it 20 seconds ago and cause you to go cursing into the night. The failings of his relationships are what form the basis of his latest song “Cult Preaching Grounds”

The track seems to take place at various times after a relationship–minutes after, what seems like days after, and even what appears to be the breakup that happens in the narrator’s head before the other party is notified, all blurring together in a bitter haze. The drunken narrator discussing the regrets that they are going to wake up to after they sleep off their booze-riddled hate-calls of the night before. The song is almost like a breakup timeline: the immediate and resentful drunk calls after the breakup occurs (“I am saying, ‘Fuck you, I wish that I had never met you'”), the moments when you offer a bit of parting advice and truly wish the other the best (“Just know I’ve felt sad enough for us both / So you be happy / And I’ll be me”), and looking in the rearview mirror with teary eyes remembering the best times and forgetting the bad (“And I am thinking / Of accents / Of Leonard Cohen of Scotland of green grass / Of being inches from your face and your electrical gaze”). It ends with a line that tends to haunt you like a ghost poet, a line that brings the rest of the song and the jumbled timeline together into an “oh shit” moment: “It’s more exciting to be fragile.” The honest realization that our lives are more interesting and hold more meaning when we open ourselves up and allow ourselves to be vulnerable to the outside world.

“Cult Preaching Grounds” is off Berger’s latest solo full-length Still Life with Prudence. Crack open a shitty beer and take a listen to the song below. Be sure to pick up, download, and stream the album when it becomes available next Tuesday, January 12 and check back here for a full review of the album as well.

[/spb_text_block] [spb_blank_spacer height=”30px” width=”1/2″ el_position=”first”] [spb_text_block animation=”none” animation_delay=”0″ padding_vertical=”0″ padding_horizontal=”0″ width=”1/2″ el_position=”last”]

[sf_social_share]

[/spb_text_block] [/spb_row]